Tag Archives: Ideas

Is it your body or your mind holding you back?

Why exercise for diabetes_(12)

The header at the top of this page is a collection of pictures of people who are on a weight loss journey. They are all at various stages on that journey, most are not at their goal weight yet.  However, each of them are now doing things they could not do before losing weight.  It is quite inspiring to see these smiling faces enjoying life while on the journey. How did they overcome their body and get so fit?  It took changing their mind so their body didn’t get in the way.

 The brain is a reality simulator.  What you imagine can seem very real.  Just think of how you feel when waking up from a dream.  The feelings can stay with you for a while, even though it was all in your head.

When your body is carrying extra weight, it can hold you back from exercising and doing many other activities you once easily enjoyed.  It can seem like you cannot exericse and it would be better to wait until you lost some weight to get started.  What you are feeling in your body is very real.  Just like a dream however, what your brain believes about how much is enough exercise may not be the reality.  Your expectations could be based on your memories of what you used to be able to do and what you want to be able to do now.  They could also be based on recommended amounts, which are really general guidelines.    Just like your dream, your mind can hold beliefs about what your body should be able to do, even when your body is telling you that it cannot do it.

This can feel like your body is getting in the way, holding you back from exercising.  However it is really your ideas about what it means to exercise that is holding you back.  Your body does not know the recommendations.  It only knows what it can do now, in this moment.  Your body does not know how many calories you want it to burn, it only knows what it will burn based upon what will be keep you healthy and well.  Your body does not know the numbers displayed on the weight machine or the treadmill or your activity monitor.  It only knows if it can tolerate what you are asking it to do.

If it cannot tolerate it, your body will let you know through pain and fatigue. Pain and fatigue are a sign of too  much too soon. Contrary to popular beliefs, pain is not a sign of progress (nope, not even muscle soreness). If you body has what it needs to do what you are asking it to do, it will let you know instantly through more energy, greater freedom of movement, more focus and a better mood.  Basically, your body is smarter than your brain when it comes to exercise. Your body and brain work best when they work together, that means your brain observes your body rather than dictates what it should be able to do.

So the next time you start thinking your body is working against you, ask what it is trying to tell you.  The answers may not be clear right away, and usually it is not telling you to stop exercise completely.  It is usually telling you it needs less for a while until it has time to adapt. You will know you have found the just right level and type of exercise by how you feel during and after exercise.  Your body  will tell you if and when it is ready for more. Until then, keep the peace between your brain and your body, by trusting you body to tell your brain how much is enough exercise right now.

Keep Moving Be Well,

Janet

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by | September 18, 2019 · 6:44 pm

Who can you inspire to move?

Who can you inspire to move_

My whole team is doing the stretches as part of our morning huddle.  We don’t have pain during the day and have more energy at the end of the day!

This week a patient shared with me an inspiring story.

She is a dental hygienist and she would always get pain her her neck and shoulders from being in that position all day long. That pain drained her energy too.  In her first visit, we did some stretches that she could incorporate into her day to see if they help with this energy draining discomfort.

They really worked for her.  So she showed the stretches to her co-workers one day at morning huddle.   Now they all don’t have that pain any more and they have more energy at the end of the day too.  They decided to make it part of their morning routine.

Kudos to you for inspiring others to move and feel better!

Who could you inspire today to keep moving and be well?

Share your story!

Janet

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by | May 22, 2019 · 4:44 pm

How to lose ten pounds of gym guilt

how to lose ten pounds of gym guilt(1)

The trend in affordable gyms has made it so much easier for many people to exercise year round.

It has also expanded the problem many people have with a gym membership  – gym guilt!

In trying to get more exercise, you might be tempted to join a gym because it’s only $10 a month.    As you may have discovered, your exercise motivation depends on A LOT of factors so getting to that gym might be not so easy.   You may be busy right now and just cannot fit it in.    Often, when trying to lose weight, walking into the gym feels like a spotlight is shining on your extra weight. It’s just too embarrassing to go right now.   You might wait until you feel better about your body and then you will start.

The bigger problem with these low cost memberships is that they are not expensive enough to make you end the membership if you are not going.  When things calm down a bit, or when you lose some weight, you will go, so why cancel it?     In the meantime, that membership fee on your credit card statement each month is a constant ‘weight’ on your mind. Its a constant reminder that you are not exercisign the way you ‘should’.

(No, I am not reading your mind, you are just not alone in this. I see it all the time!)

Lets talk about how to lose the weight of that gym guilt.  Here are some questions to ask yourself so you can finally make peace with using, or losing your gym membership.

  • Is it the commute? Does it take more time to get to and from the gym than its worth?  If your time is limited, no matter how inexpensive the membership, you probably will not to choose to spend your time on a gym commute on a consistent basis.
  • Is it the environment? When you walk into the gym, how do you feel?  Happy to be there or counting the minutes until you can leave? That initial instinct about the gym is so subtle, you may not realize it is the reason your brain finds excuses not to go.  Either find a way to make it more comfortable for you or find a new place to exercise.
  • Is it the people?  There is a definite vibe in each gym.  Some are welcoming and friendly in a very authentic way.  Some are ‘friendly’ in a “my boss told me to say hello when members walk in so I am going to flash a fake smile and say a cool hello” kind of way.  Some gyms are meant for people with very definite exercise goals. If they are not the same as yours, you may feel unwelcome, no matter what you do.  Either give yourself a pep talk reminder that the attitude of others is not your concern or find a more welcoming place to exercise.
  • Is it equipment overload?  It seems that the less expensive the gym, the larger and more daunting it can be.    If you feel overwhelmed by the equipment choices in the gym, know that much of that equipment is not useful anyway.  Find the machines right for you and  stay focused on that.  You don’t need to do everything that is in the gym.  Get a comfortable routine going and do what you enjoy most. (well OK more than the sauna and massage chairs!) When you are ready for a change, learn only one new machine at a time to stay out of overwhelm.
  • Is it too crowded when you go?  Rush hour times at the gym are about as much fun as rush hour time on the highway.  If the crowds are getting in the way of efficiently enjoying your gym time, and you cannot go at another time, seek alternate routes to exercise.
  • Is your body not ready yet?   Some types of exercise are not great for starters.  The elliptical for instance starts at a higher intensity. If you are just starting out you are likely to feel like a failure in about two minutes flat.  Group exercise classes can be motivating but they also are more likely to make you do too much too soon. Gain skills in listening to your body before joining a group. Choose the types that feel best for your body to start and gain some stamina, strength and body knowledge before expanding to other more challenging forms.
  • Is it lack of know-how?  There is no time in adult life that we learn how to exercise correctly.  If you don’t know how to exercise, you are not lacking some skill that everyone else has.  There is a lot of useless exercise information available out there, much of it based on what is marketable, not how your body is designed.  If it does not feel good, it is not good for you.  If you are a UMassMemorial Weight Center patient, contact me to chat about how to strengthen your exercise know-how

Some times the healthiest decision is to let go of the gym membership and exercise at home or someplace else.  Most importantly, lose the gym guilt, it’s is not helpful for your mind or your body.  There are plenty of other options out there and exercising at a gym is not right for everyone.   Find a way to make it work or let it go.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

 

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by | April 17, 2019 · 7:13 pm

“Exercise is Medicine for a Good Day”

consistency is the holy grail of exercise(1)

This is the patient quote of the week. I could not have said it better myself.  Design your exercise time, no matter how long or short it is, to be your medicine for a good day.  Enjoy!

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

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by | April 10, 2019 · 6:45 pm

Exercise motivation from an unlikely source

How calorie burning makes it harder to lose weight(12)

This article gives a surprising yet research backed perspective about will-power and making changes that stick.  It is pretty clear that our old way of  making exercise a habit works against us.    If you think exercise has to be hard, and you just need more self control to make yourself do it until it becomes a habit, there is a much more effective way.

We’re using tools that aren’t only weak; they’re also potentially harmful. If using willpower to keep your nose to the grindstone feels like a struggle, that’s because it is.

It turns out too, this way also puts a drain on our health

Those who were better at using self-control did have more success when it came to resisting temptations, but at a cost to their health. Their bodies suffered not only from increased stress responses, but also from premature aging of their immune cells.

What is this unlikely source that is better for our motivation and our health than good old fashion self control?   Fostering emotions like gratitude, compassion and awareness of your own strengths has a better track record for both sustaining motivation and for promoting health.

This is one of the most challenging mindsets to change about exercise.  From my experience the belief in grit, willpower and self discipline comes from the place many of us learned about exercise – through sports.  Think about it, athletes make up the majority of our images and messages about exercise in our culture.    They have amazing self control and discipline and achieve amazing levels of fitness.  How could that model steer us wrong?

An athlete has plenty of reasons to push through and stay disciplined – the competition, team mates, coaches, records – all of these external motivators drive willpower.   We ‘regular folks’ don’t have all of those, so we replace them with other external motivators –  weight goals, challenges, competitions, social media, and accountability partners.

The research is pretty clear though.  Trying to make yourself have more discipline and willpower is stressful and not built to last.   That stress strains health and energy.  It works, but it is just not sustainable, nor is it helping with exercising for long term health.

The easier and more lasting way to motivation for exercise is to  practice the skills of gratitude, compassion and pride (awareness of your personal inner strengths).

If your New Years Resolutions have faded, it may be time to dust them off and look at them through the lens of our updated understanding of lasting motivation.  You could:

  • Keep a gratitude journal, writing down one thing each day that you are grateful for about how your body moved that day
  • Practice a brief self-compassion meditation a few days a week, so you are practiced up on your skill of self compassion for those times you might use self criticism to make you motivated to exercise.
  • Do a Strength Survey to raise your awareness of your inner strengths and how you can use them to keep you motivated to exercise when life tries to get in the way.

How to you use these tools already to keep yourself motivated?  What else could you do to move away from trying to have more willpower to applying these positive emotions to help you keep moving and stay well?

Keep Moving, Be Well,
Janet

 

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by | April 2, 2019 · 6:04 pm

It’s that time again! Spring Training!

Copy of bake bread(20)Congratulations to the Boston Red Sox and to all the fans out there!  Quite exciting.

Well, the Red Sox get four months until Spring Training starts.  But what about you?  When will your Spring Training begin?

If you have been following this blog for a year or more you know what I will suggest.  Start your Spring Training this weekend!  Why?  Because when the days start getting shorter, its natural for your daily physical activity level to drop as well.  The loss of strength and stamina that naturally happens when we are less active is quite invisible. It is often only seen on that first nice spring day when you want to go and do all those great outdoor activities, but your body has other ideas!

You know that the way to avoid that humbling spring awakening is to keep moving through the winter.  When you live anywhere with weather like we have in New England, calling your winter plan “Spring Training” can be just what you need to embrace winter as the time you get ready for spring.

So, lets take that energy from the Red Sox win and turn it into a plan for staying energized to keep moving all winter long.  Write down your winter plan based on what you have learned from past winters about what does not work and what works to keep you moving.

In spring we can celebrate by enjoying the long days outdoors again.

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

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by | October 29, 2018 · 8:18 pm

Your body does not use math to solve a weight problem

Copy of bake bread(15)You are eating right and exercising and you should be losing weight.  The problem is, your body does not know this math equation.  In fact it really is not very good at something as predictable as math.  It must  consider all that is happening inside and around you, every moment of every day. Why? because this is its job, to keep you safe and well.  It may not make sense to a brain that likes logic and predictability.   But it makes sense to a body that is fully designed to sustain itself.  Your body is continually working to take care of you.  When there is pain it is for a reason.  When it is holding on to extra fluid, it is for a reason.  When there is fatigue, it is for a reason.

So when your weight loss stalls, know it is for a reason well beyond our basic math equations of calories in and calories out.  When you have to change what you are doing for exercise because of pain or fatigue, know that you are doing so to work with a body that is continually trying to help you.  When your brain and body are working together, both work better.

We like numbers because they are so concrete. We can work with them.  But our body does not go by the numbers, it has something more powerful – the intricate coordination of all cells and systems for the one single cause of keeping you alive.

Listen to your body.  Keep Moving.  Be well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery.  Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

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by | September 24, 2018 · 1:00 pm