Tag Archives: barriers

ENJOY the Holidays!

thCASYRORCIt’s the holiday season.

You might be expecting me to say how important it is to stay on your exercise routine.

Take a walk with family members instead of sitting around the table.

Exercise helps with stress.

Yada yada yada.

You know it –  I don’t need to say it.

So this is just a simple reminder to ENJOY the season –

in all its craziness, temptations, mixed emotions and stress.

As much as possible, take care of yourself.

Not because you are trying to lose or maintain weight

and you are “supposed to”

but because you know that when you take care of yourself

you  feel good,

 and when you feel good

you can really enjoy the season.

My wish for you  is that you take the very best possible care of yourself, that you feel great, and enjoy this season.

Happy Holidays!

Keep Moving, Be Well – and Enjoy!

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery. 

Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

 

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Filed under Holidays

Keep Moving Through the Holidays

holiday walkWelcome to the holiday season 2015!  Whether you are celebrating a holiday this time of year, or just reflecting on the past year – this season greets some of us with great excitement and some of us with great dread and for some a mix of both.

So as we come to another season, it is important to do a bit of a check in.  How do the holidays affect your efforts to stay on track with healthy behaviors? What has been the biggest barriers in the past? What has worked in the past?

One sure-fire way to get off track is being under stress in some way.  Whether the stress is from a longer to do list, financial pressures, family issues, or increased feelings of loneliness and depression – it has the same effect on the mind and body.  Stress shuts down the smart, rational part of the brain. We are more likely to react rather than make a healthy choice.  It also strains all systems in the body, draining the immune system and our energy.

If exercise becomes more stressful for you during this time of year, it is time to adjust your approach to exercise for this season.

Physical activity calms the mind and body and reduces stress, but only if it is crafted for that result.

  • Choose a Motivating Environment:  If going to the gym is stressful this time of year, maybe a home exercise program is more realistic.
  • Step Outdoors:  Being in nature is therapeutic for mind and body.  Bundle up and take a mindful walk, noticing the sights and sounds of the season.
  • The Gift of Togetherness + Movement:  Take a walk with friends and family is one of the best gifts you can give each other. Spending healthy quality time together is a priceless gift.
  • The Gift of Solitude:  This time of year, more socializing can be a drain for some people. Notice if you are just in need of time alone and enjoy some solitude while you move.
  • Lighten Up:  Caught in the pressures of the season?   Time to balance it with some playful physical activity.  Fire up the Wii Dance or some Geo-caching or another playful physical activity.
  • Be Realistic: This is no time to set really huge goals.  Keep it simple, specific and realistic.  Remember something is way better than nothing!
  • Plan:   Each week make your best plan for adding exercise and/or physical activity to each day. Actually write it on the to do list and the calendar.  Then each day to the best you can to accomplish that. Be ready for a plan B as needed.
  • Partner Up:  Create a strong support system with someone else you know who is committed to staying active in a healthy way this season.  Even simply texting each other each day with what you did for activity that day is a helpful support system.
  • Stay Positive:  It is human nature to focus on what we did not do.  Make a quick list each day of what you accomplished and be sure to add what you did for extra physical activity that day.  Celebrate what you did do to be well today.

The key is first to notice what you need this time of year.  Then plan physical activity that help keep you in balance.  Finally celebrate any and all successes.

In this way, physical activity helps us stay healthy in mind and body through the holidays and with a healthy start to the new year.

How do you keep moving through the holidays?  Post your ideas in the comments!

Happy, Healthy Holidays,

Keep Moving, Be Well,

Janet

Please share these posts with anyone you know interested in losing weight with or without weight loss surgery. 

Click here to learn more about the UMass Memorial Weight Center

Check out more blog posts at Keep Moving Weekly

These weekly blogs are general guidelines. These guidelines apply to patients who are cleared by a physician for the type of exercise described. Please contact your physician with any concerns or questions. Always report any symptoms associated with exercise, such as pain, irregular heartbeats, and dizziness or fainting, to your physician.

 

 

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by | December 10, 2015 · 8:35 pm

The Simple, Easy, and Free Way to Boost Health – Without Moving!

Yes! that’s right.  Your exercise physiologist is promoting a way to improve health without moving.  You can, of course move while you are doing this – so doing worry – I am not changing my passion for movement and health.

breathCheck out this blog post at The Connection.  If you have not seen the film yet, The Connection is a documentary of on the research behind the health benefits of the mind-body connection.  It is SO well done, with a  great balance between real life stories and science.  And the science is overwhelmingly impressive and motivating! Continue reading

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by | May 28, 2015 · 4:00 pm

Happiness and Exercise

I am currently enjoying reading the book Hardwiring Happiness by Dr. Rick Hanson.Hardwire

It is full of interesting information about how our brains are hardwired to look for problems to be solved. This is normal and kept us safe for many, many years.   In our modern-day however, there is a need to shift to looking for what is good in each moment.  We are no longer as threatened by physical harm, our stress today is more mental and emotional.   He discusses how simply shifting to focus on what is going well changes our brains ability to cope with stress and helps improve health as a result.

What does this have to do with exercise? Continue reading

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by | April 16, 2015 · 6:44 pm

Reducing Weight without Losing Weight

thCABPF7GPI took a car for a test drive this week. My current car is a 2004 and I have the seat perfectly adjusted so I can sit in alignment. Sitting in this 2010 car my head was pushed forward by the head rest. No matter how I adjusted the seat I could not sit with my hips shoulders and ears in alignment. That darn head rest kept pushing my head forward.

So, I asked the car salesman.   He said that not too long ago the government changed the guidelines for manufacturing car seats. They wanted to make sure that the head is on the head rest….. so they moved the head rest forward…

Does anyone see a HUGE red flag here?

Were the older cars wrong? Or, could it be that our bodies have “adapted” to our new computer working, cell phone gazing, sitting shape? Please say it isn’t so! The government, in trying to keep us safe (which I greatly appreciate), adapted the guidelines to fit this new position of our body?thCA2EI8K7

What is the big deal you may ask.

Take an object about 10 lbs.and hold it in your hands. Notice the weight. Now extend your arms so you are holding it in front of you with your arms straight. The weight did not change but it feels heavier, right?

Now think of your head (weighs about 10 lbs.) held up by your neck. With the head jutted forward those poor neck muscles are working over time. And then the back muscles need to help out.

Exercise is important. But it is only about 3% of our day if we do 45 minutes of exercise a day. The other 97% of our day is hugely thCAJSWG40important. How we hold our body during most of the day can be a breeding ground for chronic pain and injury. It can also be the breeding ground for health and well-being. It is our choice.

This week: pay attention to your body position in daily activities like driving, eating, reading, watching TV, working on a computer, brushing your teeth, talking on the phone, looking at your smart phone.

  • Notice where your head is in relation to your body.
  • Notice where you feel your weight most when sitting – on your tailbone and back, front of your hips or in the middle.
  • Notice the weight of your arms and legs.
  • Notice where your weight is on your feet when standing – on the toes, heels or in-between.
  • Which side of the body do you use more?
  • Which side do you put more weight on when sitting, standing or carrying?

Feel free to add your comments about what you notice and we will continue the chat next week…

Keep Moving, Be Well

Janet

 

 

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by | March 12, 2015 · 6:16 pm